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Showing results in Flu virus is protected by mucus when airborne, regardless of humidity

News

Mucus and other airway secretions surrounding influenza viruses when coughed or exhaled from infected individuals may protect the virus in the aerosol phase, even in high humidity environments.
Laboratory tests using H1N1 flu viruses aerosolised alongside secretions from a human lung cell culture at a range of humidities showed that both the airborne viruses and settled droplets remained equally infective at all humidities, for at least one hour.

News

Serious health impacts of smoking and ‘second-hand smoke’ are well-established, but a new study highlights ‘third-hand smoke’ (THS) as a potential source of exposure to harmful compounds derived from tobacco smoke.
Material which deposits on surfaces including clothing, carpets and furniture can partition back into the indoor airborne environment, first into the gas phase, then subsequently into the aerosol phase. The main components thought to be responsible are reduced nitrogen species (RdNS) derived from nicotine and related compounds in the original smoke.

News

Aerosol precursor compounds emitted by corals during periods of high stress from sunlight at low tide may contribute to local aerosol nucleation, leading to cloud formation and brightening which may cool and protect the coral itself. Researchers in Australia, studying an area of around 100 km2 in the Great Barrier Reef, observed correlations between satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements and a metric for coral stress, which improved at low wind speeds.

News

PM10 and PM2.5 levels in cities across the world between 2010 and 2016 collated by the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Urban Ambient Air Quality Database, which compiles data from over 4,300 cities in 108 countries worldwide, have shown that ‘pollution inequality’ between richer and poorer nations is widening.

Research

A study of 783 children in the Netherlands, utilising modelled PM10, PM2.5 and NO2 exposures during the mother’s pregnancy, has shown that maternal exposure to particulate matter can lead to impaired brain development in their children.

Research

The emission of volatile chemical products (VCPs) may contribute as much as half the total VOC emissions from ‘fossil’ petrochemical sources in western cities, according to a recent study led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), USA.

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