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Showing results in Coral reefs put up “cloud umbrellas” to keep cool

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Aerosol precursor compounds emitted by corals during periods of high stress from sunlight at low tide may contribute to local aerosol nucleation, leading to cloud formation and brightening which may cool and protect the coral itself. Researchers in Australia, studying an area of around 100 km2 in the Great Barrier Reef, observed correlations between satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements and a metric for coral stress, which improved at low wind speeds.

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PM10 and PM2.5 levels in cities across the world between 2010 and 2016 collated by the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Urban Ambient Air Quality Database, which compiles data from over 4,300 cities in 108 countries worldwide, have shown that ‘pollution inequality’ between richer and poorer nations is widening.

Research

A study of 783 children in the Netherlands, utilising modelled PM10, PM2.5 and NO2 exposures during the mother’s pregnancy, has shown that maternal exposure to particulate matter can lead to impaired brain development in their children.

Research

The emission of volatile chemical products (VCPs) may contribute as much as half the total VOC emissions from ‘fossil’ petrochemical sources in western cities, according to a recent study led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), USA.

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Aerosol science is central to a broad range of disciplines extending from drug delivery to the lungs to disease transmission, combustion and energy generation, materials processing, environmental science, and the delivery of agricultural and consumer products.
To ensure the UK is well-placed to meet the future challenges in research in aerosol science, members of the Society convened a Road-Mapping event in early January 2018. Please follow the above link for further information and to view a summary of outputs from the day.

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An airborne particle which contained enriched uranium has been observed during atmospheric aerosol sampling over the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. The single particle, with vacuum aerodynamic diameter 580 nm and containing an estimated 0.1-1% by mass of uranium, was detected at an altitude of 7 km on 3rd August 2016 during measurements as part of the Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) NASA mission. Finding uranium in airborne particles is uncommon (< 1 in 10,000 particles) but not particularly rare. However, the isotope ratio (Uranium-235 was 3.1% ± 0.5% of Uranium-238, compared with around 0.7% in natural sources) strongly suggests a hitherto undetected anthropogenic source of enriched uranium emission to the atmosphere.

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