Focus Meeting 14: Third Atmospheric Ice Nucleation Conference

10th Jan - 11th Jan 2020

Boston

This conference will provide a forum for discussion of all aspects of atmospheric ice nucleation.

It is becoming increasingly clear that the formation of ice in our atmosphere is extremely important for our planet’s climate and hydrological cycle, but our understanding of ice nucleation remains poor. This limits our ability to quantitatively address key questions such as the how changing aerosol may influence clouds and climate in the past and future. Clouds around the globe, in different altitude ranges, and different synoptic metrological regimes are influenced by ice production. In this conference we intend to cover all clouds types through a sequence of topic focused sessions.

The 3rd AINC will be held just prior to the 100th American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting, which will also be in Boston.

 

Confirmed invited speakers:

Ivy Tan – NASA
Angelos Michaelides – University College London
Tom Hill – Colorado State University
Christina McCluskey – NCAR
Zhijun Wu – Peking University
Paul Field – UK Met Office
Lulin Xue – NCAR

 

Sessions

1. The impact of ice nucleating particles on clouds and climate

2. Fundamentals of ice nucleation

3. The characteristics of atmospheric ice nucleating particles 

4. Insights from measurements of atmospheric ice nucleating particles around the world 

5. The human impact on ice nucleating particles and ice formation around the globe

6. Ice nucleating particle concentration versus ice concentrations in clouds

7. The modification of weather or climate with artificial ice nucleating particles

 

Organisation

The Aerosol Society is supporting the 3rd AINC as a Focus Meeting, but this meeting is being primarily organised by Prof. Daniel Cziczo and Prof. Benjamin J. Murray. Please direct enquiries to the organising committee at adminainc@leeds.ac.uk rather than The Aerosol Society.

The organising committee is made up of:
Daniel Cziczo
Benjamin Murray
Yan Yin
Jessie Creamean
Yutaka Tobo
Ottmar Möhler
Luis Ladino
Trude Storelvmo
Gabriele Sosso
Ann Fridlind 

 

Key dates

Abstract submission: 9th Sept 2019
Programme to be made public: 30th September 2019
Registration deadline: 28th October 2019
Conference dates: 10th – 11th January 2020

 

Registration

Registration will be open on or before 10th August along with details of accommodation options at preferred rates.

Please visit this webpage for updates.

Conference flyer

 

Call for abstracts

We welcome abstracts for contributed talks and posters which we intend to organise into these topics:

1. The impact of ice nucleating particles on clouds and climate
Ice nucleating particles influence clouds and therefore climate, but the extent to which changes in climate and aerosol emissions feedback on clouds and climate is poorly constrained. As a result, there is a large uncertainty in climate sensitivity associated with mixed phase and ice clouds.

2. Fundamentals of ice nucleation
We cannot at present make quantitative a priori predictions of how well a given material nucleates ice. Molecular simulations, theoretical studies and experimental research on ice nucleation are all advancing our knowledge on this. This limits our capacity to form physically underpinned parameterisations for use in cloud modelling.

3. The characteristics of atmospheric ice nucleating particles
In this session we go beyond measurements of atmospheric INP concentrations and focus on the nature and characteristics of atmospheric INP. For example, the size of ice nucleating particles is of central importance to INP transport, but surprisingly little is known about the size of the aerosol particles which serve as INP. The characterisation of ice crystals residues gives an important insight to INP in the atmosphere. Careful characterisation indicates that many INP are biogenic in some regions, but the sources of this INP are unclear.

4. Insights from measurements of atmospheric ice nucleating particles around the world
The last 5 years or so has seen an explosion in measurements of INP concentrations from around the work. In this session we want to explore the insights we have gained from these observations.

5. The human impact on ice nucleating particles and ice formation around the globe
Do humans influence the atmospheric INP population? Humans influence many parts of the Earth system, but it is unclear if this feeds through to changes in INP concentrations. This might include obvious anthropogenic aerosol, such as that related to industry and transport, but might also include understanding how aerosol from changing land use (agriculture) or changing climate (desertification, glacial retreat) might alter the INP burden of the atmosphere.

6. Ice nucleating particle concentration versus ice concentrations in clouds
We wish to examine the extent to which the INP population defines the ice concentration in clouds. This session will include the relative roles primary vs secondary ice production as well as the relative roles of homogeneous vs heterogeneous nucleation.

7. The modification of weather or climate with artificial ice nucleating particles
Ice nucleation has been used since the 1940’s to alter clouds and precipitation and there are many groups around the world engaged in this practice. The fundamental science needed to effectively engineer clouds and to predict the response of clouds to a changing climate is the same, hence these communities share common ground.


Abstract submission
Submit your abstracts by 9th September 2109 via this email address: adminainc@leeds.ac.uk, using this abstract template in word format by the end of the day of the deadline, indicating in your email if you would prefer a poster or talk.

Please contact adminainc@leeds.ac.uk with any questions regarding the abstract submission process.

 

 Hotel Registration 

The hotel registration site is https://www.omnihotels.com/hotels/boston-parker-house/meetings/ams-mit-subblock-01092020

(Note: our rate becomes available Monday August 19)