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About

The Drug Delivery to the Lungs conference (DDL) is Europe’s premier conference and industry exhibition which is dedicated to pulmonary and nasal drug delivery.

The focus is on providing a forum to present through podium and poster presentations recent developments in the field of inhalation therapy.

The three-day conference consists of a programme of lectures covering five session themes.  Each year the DDL Committee invite a long serving respiratory health professional to deliver the commemorative DDL Lecture as a way of recognising their significant scientific accomplishments achieved in respiratory health.  The lecture programme also features a slot dedicated to junior researchers; The Pat Burnell Award encourages students to present their work as a podium and poster presentation and from the finalists who present, a winner is awarded £500 and invited to attend the reviewing panel for the same award the following year.  In 2017 the DDL Committee introduced an award to recognise specific individuals who are early on in their career in inhalation science who have acheived significant scientific accomplishment or innovation. The winner of the DDL Emerging Scientist Award presents their research as a podium presentation at the conference as well as receiving a £1,000 prize and certificate.

Alongside the lecture programme the conference presents an impressive industry exhibition with over 90 companies participating in the event.  The exhibition is accessible to both the well-known larger pharmaceutical organisations as well as the new smaller businesses looking to have access to this highly successful forum for networking and the exchange of knowledge.


The first DDL meeting was held in 1989 at the Glaxo (now GSK) Ware site and hosted in excess of 100 delegates to the one day programme of lectures.  Run by a sub-committee of The Aerosol Society, the DDL conference proved to be a great success and it was agreed the conference should be continued to be held annually.  With primarily one main sponsor supporting the event the conference was held at a number of different venues around the UK for the first 4 years.

Church House Conference Centre, Westminster, London

In 1994 DDL held its 5th conference at Church House Conference Centre in the heart of Westminster, London.  This was considered a great venue as it was not only excellent for travel links but it also had an interesting history being an alternative seat of Parliament during air raids in the Second World War.  The DDL conference stayed on at Church House for another 9 years and grew to a two-day event. 

 

 

The EICC, Edinburgh, Scotland

Through its success the conference then had to move in 2005 to accommodate its growing number of sponsors and delegates which lead the organisers to choose its current venue in Edinburgh at the Edinburgh International Conference Centre. 

 


DDL continues to grow year on year and now welcomes over 700 attendees and over 90 industry sponsors from all around the globe.  It is said to be the highlight of the conference calendar as it not only provides a focused and relevant scientific programme, but it is accessible to all, friendly and an excellent conference to network on the run up to the festive period.


The Drug Delivery to the Lungs Conference Charter

Drug Delivery to the Lungs is Europe’s premier conference and exhibition dedicated to pulmonary and nasal drug delivery. The overarching aim of DDL is to provide an annual forum for formulators, clinicians, engineers, analysts, academics and all other professionals involved in developing medicines for inhalation.

DDL is a non-commercial meeting that is organised by a small group of volunteers drawn from across academia and industry. The conference is primarily financed by sponsorship, with the remaining costs being covered by the conference registration fees.

The specific objectives of the DDL organising committee are to:

  • Provide an interesting, high quality and varied programme that promotes, by means of podium and poster presentations and exhibitions, recent developments in the field of inhalation therapy;
  • Provide a meeting that is accessible to all interested parties by keeping the registration costs to a minimum;
  • Encourage researchers of all ages to present their work by means of short presentations;
  • Provide a friendly and informal networking event;
  • Publish the conference abstracts accessibly for the inhaled science community;
  • Utilise any surplus funds generated transparently to support the advancement of inhalation science including the funding of studentships, training events, additional meetings, travel bursaries and charity donations.